About Me

My photo

I am an honours graduate (BSc. Hons. Strath-Glasgow) coupled with an MBA-ICG (Paris) , experienced, Metallurgist - Materials Scientist and Engineer & Manager turned Consultant & Blogger. I specialised in Superalloys (aero-engine_Seminal Work peer reviewed & published IOM3_MST, Feb.1985, the 2nd issue of this now well known journal dedicated to the fundamental aspects in our multidisciplinary subject area ) My experience over a wide range of Special Alloys is extensive. (Cryogenic,Controlled Expansion-Dilatometric,Magnetic, Corrosion Resistant Grades and finally HSLA-Aircraft Undercarriage. (Great Stuff-I was lucky) My responibilities were especially in Melting & Refining to 1st Forming stage. Responsibilities include QC,QA & Accounting, Melt/Remelt Process  & Products, R&D.  Bilingual English-French. 
Read my web-logs and post a comment is certainly the best way to get to know me..

WebSearch –Try: Management-Methods-Foresight-Prospective Studies-Roadmaps-Innovation.

Custom Search

My visitors whereabouts - tell me more via a comment or back link

New Scientist - Environment

Renewable energy : nature.com subject feeds

ScienceDirect Publication: Journal of CO2 Utilization

Shale Debate, UK

News - Steel Market Update - Steel Market Update

Friday, 11 April 2014

World must adapt to unknown climate future, says IPCC-Reports from New Scientist(NSci) via NSci-RSS Feed on this blog

NSci_Report on Climate Change, 03 April 2014 by Michael Slezak of NSci.

Perhaps chance readers may not have taken notice of my New Scientist feed links on Climate Change - Global Warming and their relationship to exessive GHG-GreenHouse Gases represented most often by ever increasing CO2 levels (inspite of some efforts to correct this).

Here, I have simply quoted the introduction to M. Slezaks article in order to draw readers attention to the renowned journal "New Scientist" and its effort to bring Climate (Change) Science & its important (life threatening) implications to as wide a public as possible and to the interest & to the importance & convenience of examining NSci's RSS feed links on my page heading.

"There is still great uncertainty about the impacts of climate change, according to the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, released today. So if we are to survive and prosper, rather than trying to fend off specific threats like cyclones, we must build flexible and resilient societies.


Today's report is the second of three instalments of the IPCC's fifth assessment of climate change. The first instalment, released last year, covered the physical science of climate change. It stated with increased certainty that climate change is happening, and that it is the result of humanity's greenhouse gas emissions. The new report focuses on the impacts of climate change and how to adapt to them. The third instalment, on how to cut greenhouse gas emissions, comes out in April.
The latest report backs off from some of the predictions made in the previous IPCC report, in 2007. During the final editing process, the authors also retreated from many of the more confident projections from the final draft, leaked last year. The IPCC now says it often cannot predict which specific impacts of climate change – such as droughts, storms or floods – will hit particular places.
Instead, the IPCC focuses on how people can adapt in the face of uncertainty, arguing that we must become resilient against diverse changes in the climate."
FOR MORE ON THIS VISIT  The New Scientist's Climate Change Topic Guide. and get your community involves in the combat, "The Good Fight, The Fight for Good" and our future generation's health, safety and happiness.